The Occupational Safety and Health Administration has initiated a campaign focusing on workplace safety for youth workers in Minnesota and the rest of the country. The agency has highlighted the employer duties that can help ensure that young workers remain safe while on the job.

Young workers are typically new to the workforce and include individuals who are no more than 24 years of age. The OSHA campaign is reminding employers of the child labor laws and that there are restrictions to the types of jobs that youths under the age of 18 can have.

OHSA has also provided tips for protecting young, temporary workers. Employers have an obligation to treat temporary workers as they do current workers, particularly in regard to providing sufficient training. The host employers and the temporary staffing agencies both have control over the employee and share in the responsibility for ensuring safety.

According to OSHA, the first-line supervisors are in the best position to protect younger workers and shape their work habits. That’s why it’s important that these individuals place a focus on safety.

Employers should also have a clear understanding and be in compliance with state and federal laws. It is their responsibility to make sure that young workers have the training they need to identify hazards and are capable of engaging in safe work habits. A mentoring system should be in place for young workers so that they can ask questions and receive assistance when learning a new job.

Workers who sustain on-the-job injuries because of inadequate workplace safety may have legal recourse. A personal injury attorney may help an injured worker file a complaint with OSHA and pursue financial damages.